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Unix, Xenix and ODT General FAQ

This is an ancient post with no relevance to modern systems.

This article is from a FAQ concerning SCO operating systems. While some of the information may be applicable to any OS, or any Unix or Linux OS, it may be specific to SCO Xenix, Open There is lots of Linux, Mac OS X and general Unix info elsewhere on this site: Search this site is the best way to find anything.

How do I get a copy of adb? (old SCO Unix)

Ancient OSes sometimes left things out:

If you have the Development System, you already have /bin/adb. If not, you may need to grab a copy from your distribution, or it may already have been installed, depending on your OS and version. It could be called /bin/adb (older Xenix) or /etc/_fst (Unix and recent versions of Xenix). If you don't have either of these, look through the files in /etc/perms for them; in Xenix 2.3.4, you will find one of each, which will be in fact the exact same file but on two different diskettes. If the volume on which the file you want is mountable (you can check this in the manual, or use the dtype command), then mount it and copy the file off. Otherwise, use tar to extract the file, keeping in mind that the filenames on your diskettes are all written with relative paths (i.e. ./bin/adb, not /bin/adb). Note that if you look in the Unix documentation, it may well tell you that you need /bin/adb, when in fact it's called /etc/_fst.



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