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© December 2003 Tony Lawrence

SCO Unix/System V Printing FAQ

How do I stop staircase output on a SCO Unix/System V printer?

This is caused by the different ways that DOS and Unix handle the end of a text line. Unix ends a line with a LF (Line Feed, 0x0A) character, while DOS uses both a LF and a CR (Carriage Return, 0x0D).

In Linux, your printer setup tool should offer this translation as an option.

Staircase is when you printer prints like this:


 Everything starts out OK, but when you reach 
                                              the end of a line, it moves
                                                                          down but not back
 

(With a laser printer, the same problem will cause only one or even no lines to print)

If a printer is expecting both characters, getting only a LF tells it to only do a Line Feed without a Carriage Return, so that's just what it does, and that's just what you get.

There are at least five ways to fix this:



David DiPieto offered these thoughts:

 Date: Tue, 29 Dec 1998 16:05:40 -0500
 From: David DiPietro <[email protected]>
 To: [email protected]
 Subject: printer stairstepping ...
 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
 
 I thought I'd share a little opost experience with you.  When I install
 our application software I automatically add a "holdopen" for each
 parallel and serial printer to append the <cr> to <lf> as you mention in
 your printer discussion.  Most of our sites now involve some kind of
 networking and printer sharing.  I had been putting the high-speed
 lasers on the parallel ports on the SCO Unix server but starting having
 a problem with Windows applications printing graphics.  I would often
 loose data or get garbled graphics.  I finally decided to take the time
 to figure out what was going on using the hex dump mode on a Lexmark
 Laser.  Apparently, and with understanding, having opost onlcr turned on
 will do a straight binary filter of the printer data replacing all <nl>
 with <cr><nl> - even if it occurs in the middle of a raster graphics
 string.  This could - and will most likely - reak havoc on the output! 
 You may want to address this in your discussion.  In my case, the
 problem was solved completely by turning on the auto <cr> at the
 printer.
 Dave DiPietro/Abacus Systems Inc.
 (973) 875-9900
 

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